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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 12 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Cattle branding near Arkalon, Kansas

Steele, F. M. (Francis Marion), 1866-1936

Con Jackson (left) and Lee Larrabee (right) are branding and ear-marking an animal near Arkalon, Kansas. Two horses with ropes tied to the saddles are visible in the photograph. Jackson won the riding contest at the Cattleman's Convention in Wichita, Kansas, in the spring of 1901. A horse soon learns to keep the rope stretched tight so the animal has no ability to use the rope to jerk the horse.

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Fred Tainter's ranch in Beaver County, Oklahoma Territory

Steele, F. M. (Francis Marion), 1866-1936

View of Fred Tainter's chuckwagon with cowboys seated on the ground eating a meal. Also visible are horses and a herd of cattle in the background.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday, founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory, wrote from "Up the River," Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania, describing the difficult living conditions for him and the other men at the future site of Topeka, where they had been visited by Governor Andrew H. Reeder. Holliday assured his wife of his health and requested that she explain to Mr. Drew Lowry and Mr. McFarland in Pennsylvania why he had not written. He praised the beauty of the country and expressed his vision of its future, ending with a request that she write to him.

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S.H. Moore, reminiscences

Hyatt, Thaddeus

This testimony made up a portion of the Journal of Investigations in Kansas, a collection of personal reminiscences that was apparently recorded by Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. This particular account relates the experience of S. H. Moore, a resident of Ottawa, Kansas Territory. Mr. Moore describes the land, vegetation, etc. around Ottawa and mentions various settlers from the area.

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Roping an outlaw steer near Ashland, Kansas

Steele, F. M. (Francis Marion), 1866-1936

View of three cowboys on horseback holding ropes attached to a steer, and a single cowboy, standing on the ground, holding the steer's tail.

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Thomas Hopkins Webb to Isaac Tichenor Goodnow

Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866

Thomas Webb, Secretary of the New England Emigrant Aid Company, wrote to Isaac Goodnow, indicating his overwhelming approval for the creation of a college in Manhattan, Kansas Territory, not knowing of a "more beautiful and eligible spot than the one selected." Webb communicated his pride in the fact that a Free State supporter would be the one to initiate such a project, and told Goodnow he had recently received a $12,000 donation from a Massachusetts man, which was to support the college.

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Leigh R. Webber to Senorita Morena (Miss Brown)

Webber, L. R.

A letter written by Leigh R. Webber from Fort Riley, Kansas, addressed to "Senorita Morena," or Miss Brown, a daughter of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. Webber first praises Fort Riley and describes the surrounding landscape. He goes on to describe fort life, including equipment and food. He also discusses his thoughts on the troops' future plans to march to New Mexico and his efforts to learn Spanish.

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James R. Mead to his father

Mead, James R. (James Richard), b. 1836

In this letter, James Mead writes from Tecumseh, Kansas Territory, to his father about his efforts to secure a claim. He includes information about the people of the territory, the beautiful vegetation, and the flourishing towns. Mead also writes of the immense amount of traffic along the Santa Fe Trail and of the roads to Lecompton and Topeka, which he declares are "the best roads I ever saw anywhere." In addition, he describes the buildings of Burlingame, Kansas Territory, and the make up of the community. At the end of the letter, he mentions the new constitution, which "is all Free State." These typed copies of the James R. Mead's letters were donated to the Kansas State Historical Society by Mr. Mead's family in 1940 when the originals were still owned by the family. The originals are now held by Wichita State University.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Topeka, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. After a loving introduction, he described Kansas Territory's sunny, breezy climate. Holliday mentioned letters received from his brother and Mr. Thomas Willson, both named in previous letters, who also wanted to emigrate. He described the principle building in Topeka, which served as meeting hall, hotel, and church, and where he slept with Frye W. Giles, a free state supporter from Chicago. Holliday ended with concern for Lizzie, Mary Holliday's younger sister.

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Wheat stacks in Kiowa County, Kansas

Steele, F. M. (Francis Marion), 1866-1936

View of wheat stacks in the field in Kiowa County, Kansas. A horse-drawn carriage is visible in the background.

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