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Date -- 1880s (Remove)
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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 13 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Eli Thayer

Portrait of Eli Thayer, 1819-1899, who in 1853-54 was a representative in the Massachusetts legislature and while there, originated and organized the New England Emigrant Aid Company. He worked to combine the northern states in support of his plan to send antislavery settlers into Kansas. Lawrence, Topeka, Manhattan, and Ossawatomie, Kansas, were settled under the auspices of his company.

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Richard West to John P. St. John

Richard West, a resident of Barton Station, Alabama, wrote this letter to Kansas governor St. John requesting information about available land in Kansas. West was a farmer who described in some detail many of the concerns facing emigrants, including transportation and other expenses. In addition to his role as governor of Kansas, St. John also served on the Board of Directors of the Kansas Freedmen?s Relief Association.

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H. Butterfield to Governor John A. Martin

H. Butterfield of Salem, Jewell County, Kansas, writes to Governor John A. Martin in Topeka with a list of questions about the recently amended alcohol prohibition law regulating the sale of alcohol by druggists. Butterifeld asks whether any person can sign a prescription for alcohol, whether a druggist has a right to sell alcohol to someone the druggist knows will get drunk, what can be done when the county offices will not prosecute violations of the law, whether a minor has a right to a permit as a druggist to sell alcohol, and whether a billiard hall saloon that remains open on Sundays can be declared a nuisance and prosecuted under the law. Butterfield concludes by expressing his support for prohibition and asking for better enforcement of the law.

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Elam Bartholomew diary

Bartholomew, Elam

Elam Bartholomew was a resident of Rooks County and Hays, Kansas. He was a horticulturalist, internationally known for his work with fungi. His diary reflects his active participation in Republican Party politics, local government, the United Presbyterian Church, farm organizations, and experimental farming. Elam Bartholomew settled in Rooks County, Kansas, in 1874. He was born in Pennsylvania and his family moved to Ohio and then Illinois. In 1873 he became engaged to Rachel Montgomery and returned to Illinois to marry her in June 1876. They returned to Kansas in September of 1876. The Bartholomews lived on their farm on Bow Creek until 1929 when they moved to Hays, where he served as curator of the mycological museum at Fort Hays Kansas State College. He died in 1934.

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Josiah BreckBill McAfee

Martin, H. T.

This cabinet card shows Josiah BreckBill McAfee, (1830-1908). McAfee an ordained Lutheran minister from Pennsylvania migrated, in 1855, to Leavenworth, Kansas. A supporter of the Free-State movement, he was compelled to advocate against the teachings and beliefs of the institution of slavery in the Kansas territory. On September 1, 1862, Reverend McAfee enlisted with the Eleventh Regiment of the Kansas Volunteer Infantry and served as the first lieutenant of the company. He also served in various capacities during the war from captain to company chaplain. In 1863, McAfee was assigned to the Second Regiment of the Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry. He mustered out of the military to accept the position as private secretary to Kansas Governor Samuel Crawford, (1865-1867). On August 18, 1867, he was appointed to the position of adjutant general. McAfee's long and successful military career came to a close, on March 3, 1869, but his duties as a civil servant were far from over. From 1870 to 1871, McAfee served as mayor of Topeka, Kansas. During his term he refused to issue liquor licenses to saloon owners in the capital city and even forgave his salary as mayor to support the temperance movement. In 1883 when McAfee was elected, to the first of three terms, to the Kansas House of Representatives from Shawnee County's 42nd District seat he continued to advocate for prohibition by serving on temperance committees. McAfee's tireless and unselfish work for the citizens of Kansas came to an end on May 19, 1908, when he passed away at the age of seventy-eight at his Topeka home.

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Josiah BreckBill McAfee

Gardner, R.G.

This carte de visite shows Josiah BreckBill McAfee, (1830-1908). McAfee an ordained Lutheran minister from Pennsylvania migrated, in 1855, to Leavenworth, Kansas. A supporter of the Free-State movement, he was compelled to advocate against the teachings and beliefs of the institution of slavery in the Kansas territory. On September 1, 1862, Reverend McAfee enlisted with the Eleventh Regiment of the Kansas Volunteer Infantry and served as the first lieutenant of the company. He also served in various capacities during the war from captain to company chaplain. In 1863, McAfee was assigned to the Second Regiment of the Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry. He mustered out of the military to accept the position as private secretary to Kansas Governor Samuel Crawford, (1865 to 1867). On August 18, 1867, he was appointed to the position of adjutant general. McAfee's long and successful military career came to a close, on March 3, 1869, but his duties as a civil servant were far from over. From 1870 to 1871, McAfee served as mayor of Topeka, Kansas. During his term he refused to issue liquor licenses to saloon owners in the capital city and even forgave his salary as mayor to support the temperance movement. In 1883 when McAfee was elected, to the first of three terms, to the Kansas House of Representatives from Shawnee county's 42nd District seat he continued to advocate for prohibition by serving on temperance committees. McAfee's tireless and unselfish work for the citizens of Kansas came to an end on May 19, 1908, when he passed away at the age of seventy-eight at his Topeka home.

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Josiah BreckBill McAfee

Bliss & Wentworth

This carte de visite shows Josiah BreckBill McAfee, (1830-1908). McAfee an ordained Lutheran minister from Pennsylvania migrated, in 1855, to Leavenworth, Kansas. A supporter of the Free-State movement, he was compelled to advocate against the teachings and beliefs of the institution of slavery in the Kansas territory. On September 1, 1862, Reverend McAfee enlisted with the Eleventh Regiment of the Kansas Volunteer Infantry and served as the first lieutenant of the company. He also served in various capacities during the war from captain to company chaplain. In 1863, McAfee was assigned to the Second Regiment of the Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry. He mustered out of the military to accept the position as private secretary to Kansas Governor Samuel Crawford, (1865-1867). On August 18, 1867, he was appointed to the position of adjutant general. McAfee's long and successful military career came to a close, on March 3, 1869, but his duties as a civil servant were far from over. From 1870 to 1871 McAfee served as mayor of Topeka, Kansas. During his term he refused to issue liquor licenses to saloon owners in the capital city and even forgave his salary as mayor to support the temperance movement. In 1883 when McAfee was elected ,to the first of three terms, to the Kansas House of Representatives from Shawnee County's 42nd District seat he continued to advocate for prohibition by serving on temperance committees. McAfee's tireless and unselfish work for the citizens of Kansas came to an end on May 19, 1908, when he passed away at the age of seventy-eight at his Topeka home.

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Josiah BreckBill McAfee

Martin, H. T.

This cabinet card shows Josiah BreckBill McAfee, (1830-1908). McAfee an ordained Lutheran minister from Pennsylvania migrated, in 1855, to Leavenworth, Kansas. A supporter of the Free-State movement, he was compelled to advocate against the teachings and beliefs of the institution of slavery in the Kansas territory. On September 1, 1862, Reverend McAfee enlisted with the Eleventh Regiment of the Kansas Volunteer Infantry and served as the first lieutenant of the company. He also served in various capacities during the war from captain to company chaplain. In 1863, McAfee was assigned to the Second Regiment of the Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry. He mustered out of the military to accept the position as private secretary to Kansas Governor Samuel Crawford, (1865-1867). On August 18, 1867, he was appointed to the position of adjutant general. McAfee's long and successful military career came to a close, on March 3, 1869, but his duties as a civil servant were far from over. From 1870 to 1871, McAfee served as mayor of Topeka, Kansas. During his term he refused to issue liquor licenses to saloon owners in the capital city and even forgave his salary as mayor to support the temperance movement. In 1883 when McAfee was elected, to the first of three terms, to the Kansas House of Representatives from Shawnee's County's 42nd District seat he continued to advocate for prohibition by serving on temperance committees. McAfee's tireless and unselfish work for the citizens of Kansas came to an end on May 19, 1908, when he passed away at the age of seventy-eight at his Topeka home.

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Josiah BreckBill McAfee

Dowing, George

This cabinet card shows Josiah BreckBill McAfee, (1830-1908). McAfee an ordained Lutheran minister from Pennsylvania migrated, in 1855, to Leavenworth, Kansas. A supporter of the Free-State movement, he was compelled to advocate against the teachings and beliefs of the institution of slavery in the Kansas territory. On September 1, 1862, Reverend McAfee enlisted with the Eleventh Regiment of the Kansas Volunteer Infantry and served as the first lieutenant of the company. He also served in various capacities during the war from captain to company chaplain. In 1863, McAfee was assigned to the Second Regiment of the Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry. He mustered out of the military to accept the position as private secretary to Kansas Governor Samuel Crawford, (1865-1867). On August 18, 1867, he was appointed to the position of adjutant general. McAfee's long and successful military career came to a close, on March 3, 1869, but McAfee's duties as a civil servant were far from over. From 1870 to 1871, McAfee served as mayor of Topeka, Kansas. During his term he refused to issue liquor licenses to saloon owners in the capital city and he even gave up his salary as mayor to support the temperance movement. In 1883 when McAfee was elected, to the first of three terms, to the Kansas House of Representatives from Shawnee County's Forty-Second District seat he continued to advocate for prohibition by serving on temperance committees. McAfee's tireless and unselfish work for the citizens of Kansas came to an end on May 19, 1908, when he passed away at the age of seventy-eight at his Topeka home.

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A handbook of useful information for immigrants and settlers

Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railway Company

Published by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad, this pamphlet encouraged agricultural settlement on railroad lands in Kansas by glorifying the state's natural resources including water, soil, mineral deposits and plant life. Printed by the Kansas Farmer in Topeka, Kansas.

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