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Page 1 of 5, showing 10 records out of 42 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

First Thanksgiving Sermon

McVicar, Peter, 1829-1903

This sermon by Rev. Peter McVicar's sermons is entitled "First Thanksgiving Sermon." It was delivered in Topeka on November 29, 1860, just weeks after he assumed the pastorate of the Congregational Church. McVicar focused on the concept that God's blessings were not to be measured by the accumulation of money or property, making specific comments about Kansas. He suggested, for example, that citizens of Kansas Territory who gathered together on that day should be especially thankful for the hardships endured by "early" settlers in order to establish freedom from slavery.

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Rachel Garrison to Samuel Adair

Garrison, Rachel A.

Rachel Garrison wrote to her cousin, Samuel Adair, that she had a little daughter two months old, which meant she was pregnant when her husband, David Garrison, was killed in the Battle of Osawatomie in August, 1856, and when she returned to Yellow Springs, Ohio. She also mentioned her other daughter, Jania. She hoped Adair could hold on to the claim the Garrisons pre-empted until it could be entered at the land office. She also listed items she would like Adair to sell for her. The same letter also contained correspondence from James Garrison.

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Harry Walter Colmery with his wife Minerva and children

Harry W. Colmery, his wife Minerva (Mina), and their children Harry Jr., Mary, and Sarah are standing by a car.

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Nancy Landon Kassebaum with her children

A photograph of Nancy Landon Kassebaum with her children (l to r) John, Richard, Linda and Bill, taken on primary election night. Kassebaum was running as a Republican candidate for the United States Senate.

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S.T. Shore, testimony

This testimony, a portion of the Journal of Investigations in Kansas, was collected by the National Kansas Committee under the leadership of Thaddeus Hyatt. Although Captain Shore was a free state militia captain and was active during the border warfare of 1856, this account focuses on his personal life and his perceptions of the Kansas Territory rather than upon his political or military experiences. The testimony begins with general information about his family, claim, etc., and then proceeds to his personal opinion of the land and vegetation in Kansas.

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Samuel Lyle Adair to John Brown

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

Samuel Adair wrote his brother-in-law John Brown from Osawatomie on October 2, 1857, to explain why he could not come see Brown in Iowa. Much of letter describes the general poor state of health in his locale, but he also comments on the political and especially the prospects for free state success in the upcoming election--Adair was not optimistic.

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Alfred Mossman Landon

Baugh's Studio

This photograph shows Alf Landon with his father John Manual Landon in their garden. Alf Landon is on the right.

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Elam Bartholomew diary

Bartholomew, Elam

Elam Bartholomew was a resident of Rooks County and Hays, Kansas. He was a horticulturalist internationally known for his work with fungi. His diary reflects his active participation in Republican Party politics, local government, the United Presbyterian Church, farm organizations, and experimental farming. Elam Bartholomew settled in Rooks County, Kansas, in 1874. He was born in Pennsylvania and his family moved to Ohio and then Illinois. In 1873 he became engaged to Rachel Montgomery and returned to Illinois to marry her in June 1876. They returned to Kansas in September of 1876. The Bartholomews lived on their farm on Bow Creek until 1929 when they moved to Hays where he served as curator of the mycological museum at Fort Hays Kansas State College. He died in 1934.

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Samuel Lyle Adair to John Brown

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

From Osawatomie, Samuel Adair wrote his brother-in-law John Brown regarding monies Adair had received for the "free State men in Kansas" and specifies how these funds were distributed.

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Samuel Lyle Adair family

Cased sixth plate daguerreotype portrait of Samuel Adair, Charles Storrs Adair, Florella Brown Adair, and Emma Florilla Adair. The family settled near Osawatomie, Kansas Territory, where Adair was a minister and free state supporter. His wife was a half sister to John Brown and he occasionally stayed with the Adairs. The family was involved in various free state and relief activities.

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