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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 13 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Milton M. Powers to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

Milton M. Powers, Deputy Clerk of Court in Columbus, Ohio wrote to Cyrus K. Holliday, Free State leader and founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory. Powers had read of Holliday's activities in northern newspapers. A presentation of the Wrongs of Kansas, emphasizing Andrew H. Reeder and Samuel N. Wood's experiences, had emotionally motivated Powers to write and assure Holliday of his support. Once a Jeffersonian Democrat, but convicted that the party had abandoned its principles, Powers had become a Republican. He stated that the entire nation was attuned to events in Kansas Territory, and he believed that these events would have intense impact on the nation's future.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, who, accompanied by Mrs. Edward C. K. Garvey, had returned to Meadville, Pennsylvania to give birth to her second child. Meanwhile, Cyrus Holliday (who was Vice President of the upper territorial legislative body, the Council) had passed four bills, including one establishing Topeka as the Shawnee county seat. He bought new clothes for the session, since Lawrence had become more refined, with a new hotel. Holliday mentioned emigration to Pikes Peak, the Topeka bridge, trouble in L[i]nn county, and meeting three women, Mrs. Smith, Mrs. [Robert] Morrow, and Mrs. O'Donell (possibly Mrs. William O'Donnall) in Lawrence. He proposed that Liz, Mary Holliday's younger sister, return with her.

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John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

Although Ingalls began this relatively brief letter from Sumner with comments on the local election (he won the race for city attorney), he devoted most of it to the Pike's Peak Gold Rush--"the amount and character of the emigration to Pike's Peak is truly astonishing. . . . [T] military roads are already thronged with anxious hundreds, on foot, dragging hand carts, on mules, and with ox teams."

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Henry Parker to Hiram Hill

Parker, Henry F.

Henry Parker wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill, soliciting his approval for the sale of a town lot in West Lawrence to Mr. Nathan Starks. Parker added that Lykins, the previous owner of the lot, had also sold his mill, and wished to settle his business immediately. He also asked Hill if he would be willing to invest in the construction of a court house for Douglas County.

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J. Lee Knight

J. Lee Knight was a photographer. He owned the New River Side Galley in Topeka, Kansas Territory.

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Horse sale, Santa Fe, Haskell County, Kansas

Steele, F. M. (Francis Marion), 1866-1936

There was brisk trading in Santa Fe, Kansas, whenever a herd of sleek horses like these were offered for sale, as the pioneers were unaccustomed to the benefits of motorized farming, and even motor cars were a rarity. John Jacob Miller is shown facing the camera (sixth man from the right, dressed in a hat, tie, white shirt, and vest). Also visible in the photograph are the Haskell County courthouse, Cave's Store, and Frank McCoy Lands. Santa Fe was the first county seat of Haskell County, Kansas. In 1912, the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railroad built a line from Dodge City, Kansas, to Elkhart, Texas, that bypassed the town by seven miles. In 1920, the Haskell Country seat was moved to Sublette, which had prospered by being on the AT&SF rail line, and Santa Fe faded away into a ghost town.

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S. P. Hartz to Samuel N. Wood

Hartz, S. P.

S. P. Hartz, a medical doctor, wrote to Samuel N. Wood from Allen, Breckinridge (now Lyon) County, Kansas Territory, regarding the Woods' "sick son," but devoted most of his two page letter to a legislative issue--the proposal to make Allen the county seat of a new county.

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Hugh A. Cook with his wife and children

Lamon, W. H.

Portrait of Mr. & Mrs. Hugh A. Cook and their three eldest children. He was the second Sheriff of Franklin County, Kansas. Photo taken by W. H. Lamon, Lawrence, Kansas.

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Hugh A. Cook with his wife and children

Lamon, W. H.

Portrait of Mr. & Mrs. Hugh A. Cook with three children and their dog. Cook was the second Sheriff of Franklin County, Kansas. Photo taken by W. H. Lamon of Lawrence, Kansas.

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Henry Kuhn collection, record [and recipe] book

Kuhn, Henry, 1830-1900

This record book includes a territorial map of Shannon township, Atchison County, Kansas, drawn by Henry Kuhn, county surveyor of Atchison County from 1856-1858. It also includes a registry of voters of Atchison and Shannon townships printed in 1859 and signed by Kuhn as township clerk. It also includes an alphabetical list of section owners. Later the book was used to record cooking and baking recipes. Henry Kuhn was born in Franklin County, Pennsylvania, on February 2nd, 1830. In 1854 he moved his family to Atchison County, Kansas Territory, where he was the first superintendent of public instruction, county surveyor, and helped organize the First National Bank. Kuhn enlisted in the Eighth Kansas Infantry in September 1861. He served under Colonel John A. Martin (Kansas Governor 1885 - 1889) until the end of the war. His last active rank was commissioned Captain. From 1865 to 1891 he resided at Fort Leavenworth where he organized the German Savings Bank, built the city's first railroad, and was chief clerk and acting agent for the Indian agency in Indian Territory (Oklahoma). Then he moved to Marion County where he farmed and raised stock. In 1890 he began publishing the "Marion Times." In February 1899 he moved back to Atchison and published the "Atchison Champion." In the autumn of 1899 he moved to Topeka where he died June 11th, 1900.

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