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Page 1 of 1, showing 9 records out of 9 total, starting on record 1, ending on 9

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok

This formal portrait take in Hays, Kansas shows James Butler " Wild Bill" Hickok, 1837-1876. The legendary lawman and gun-slinger begins his career in 1858 as peace officer of the Monticello Township in the Kansas Territory of Johnson County. For a number of years Hickok also works as a government scout, guide and deputy U.S. marshal across the Great Plains. His reputation as a skilled marksman proceeds him wherever he went. In 1869 Hickok is elected marshal of Hays, Kansas and sheriff of Ellis County, Kansas. A role he serves until 1870. In 1871, he is hired as Abilene, Kansas' town marshal. As marshal he earns fame for being a quick draw and for spending most of his time playing cards. Hickok is killed on August 01, 1876 while playing a game of poker at a saloon in the Deadwood, Dakota Territory.

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James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok

This formal portrait shows James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok,1837-1876. The legendary lawman and gun-slinger begins his career in 1858 as peace officer of the Monticello Township in the Kansas Territory of Johnson County. For a number of years Hickok also works as a government scout, guide and deputy U.S. marshal across the Great Plains. His reputation as a skilled marksman proceeds him wherever he went. In 1869 Hickok is elected marshal of Hays, Kansas and sheriff of Ellis County, Kansas. A role he serves until 1870. In 1871, he is hired as Abilene, Kansas' town marshal. As town marshal he earns fame for being a quick draw and for spending most of his time playing cards. Hickok is killed on August 01, 1876 while playing a game of poker at a saloon in the Deadwood, Dakota Territory.

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Willliam B. Shockley affidavit

Shockley, William B.

William B. Shockley, Clerk of the District Court at Cherokee County, testifies before Henry G. Sumner, Justice of the Peace of Cherokee County, concerning an armed band of men opposing the operation of a land office at Baxter Springs (Cherokee County). The band of two hundred and twelve armed men identified themselves as the Cherokee Neutral Land League. The League arrested or threatened persons associated with the land office and raided the office to steal its plat maps and land entries. The League was composed of many settlers of the Cherokee Neutral Lands, which lands were open for sale in 1866 by treaty with the Cherokee. The League's actions were an attempt to stop the construction of a railroad by the Missouri River, Fort Scott & Gulf Railroad whose recent purchase of the lands many considered illegal. James F. Joy represented the railroad. In May 1869, Governor James Harvey appealed for federal troops to help control settler violence.

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Hugh A. Cook with his wife and children

Lamon, W. H.

Portrait of Mr. & Mrs. Hugh A. Cook and their three eldest children. He was the second Sheriff of Franklin County, Kansas. Photo taken by W. H. Lamon, Lawrence, Kansas.

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Hugh A. Cook with his wife and children

Lamon, W. H.

Portrait of Mr. & Mrs. Hugh A. Cook with three children and their dog. Cook was the second Sheriff of Franklin County, Kansas. Photo taken by W. H. Lamon of Lawrence, Kansas.

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James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok

This carte-de-visite shows James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok, 1837-1876. The legendary lawman and gun-slinger begins his career in 1858 as peace officer of the Monticello Township in the Kansas Territory of Johnson County. For a number of years Hickok also works as a government scout, guide and deputy U.S. marshal across the Great Plains. His reputation as a skilled marksman proceeds him wherever he went. In 1869 Hickok is elected marshal of Hays, Kansas and sheriff of Ellis County, Kansas. A role he serves until 1870. In 1871, he is hired as Abilene, Kansas' town marshal. As marshal he earns fame for being a quick draw and for spending most of his time playing cards. Hickok is killed on August 01, 1876 while playing a game of poker at a saloon in the Deadwood, Dakota Territory.

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James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok

Neuman, A., Rolla, MO.

This formal portrait shows James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok, 1837-1876. The legendary lawman and gun-slinger begins his career in 1858 as peace officer of the Monticello Township in the Kansas Territory of Johnson County. For a number of years Hickok also works as a government scout, guide and deputy U.S. marshal across the Great Plains. His reputation as a skilled marksman proceeds him wherever he went. In 1869 Hickok is elected marshal of Hays, Kansas and sheriff of Ellis County, Kansas. A role he serves until 1870. In 1871, he is hired as Abilene, Kansas' town marshal. As marshal he earns fame for being a quick draw and for spending most of his time playing cards. Hickok is killed on August 01, 1876 while playing a game of poker at a saloon in the Deadwood, Dakota Territory.

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James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok

Smith, Charles T.

This formal portrait shows James Butler " Wild Bill" Hickok,1837-1876. The legendary lawman and gun-slinger begins his career in 1858 as peace officer of the Monticello Township in the Kansas Territory of Johnson County. For a number of years Hickok also works as a government scout, guide and deputy U.S. marshal across the Great Plains. His reputation as a skilled marksman proceeds him wherever he went. In 1869 Hickok is elected marshal of Hays, Kansas and sheriff of Ellis County, Kansas. A role he servs until 1870. In 1871, he is hired as Abilene, Kansas' town marshal. As marshal he earns the reputation for being a quick draw and for spending most of his time playing cards. Hickok is killed on August 01, 1876 while playing a game of poker at a saloon in the Deadwood, Dakota Territory.

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James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok

Weinsell, S., Art Gallery, Junction City, Kansas

This formal portrait shows James Butler " Wild Bill" Hickok, 1837-1876. The legendary lawman and gun-slinger begins his career in 1858 as peace officer of the Monticello Township in the Kansas Territory of Johnson County. For a number of years Hickok also works as a government scout, guide and deputy U.S. marshal across the Great Plains. His reputation as a skilled marksman proceeds him wherever he went. In 1869 Hickok is elected marshal of Hays, Kansas and sheriff of Ellis County, Kansas. A role he serves until 1870. In 1871, he is hired as Abilene, Kansas' town marshal. As marshal he earns fame for being a quick draw and for spending most of his time playing cards. Hickok is killed on August 01, 1876 while playing a game of poker at a saloon in the Deadwood, Dakota Territory.

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